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Stories

When the last oil well runs dry

Alex Kirby, BBC

Just as certain as death and taxes is the knowledge that we shall one day be forced to learn to live without oil.

archived April 18, 2004

Report: Oil Will Cost $51/barrel by 2025

AP, AP

WASHINGTON - Crude oil prices will increase gradually and reach $51 a barrel by 2025 due to inflation and rising energy needs in developing nations, according to an Energy Department projection.

archived April 13, 2004

Surviving oil shocks

FT UK, Financial Times UK

With US Treasury secretary John Snow ratcheting up his criticism of Opec, it is clear the Bush administration is alarmed about rising oil prices.

archived April 13, 2004

Plan War and the Hubbert Oil Curve, An Interview with Richard Heinberg

David Ross, ZNet Venezuala

Richard Heinberg is a professor at the Santa Rosa branch of the New College of California, where he teaches courses on Culture, Ecology and Sustainable Community.

archived April 16, 2004

Guzzling Gas

Washington Post Editorial, Washington Post

IN POORER COUNTRIES, a rise in the price of bread can set off a revolution. In this country, the price of gasoline sometimes seems to have the same kind of power.

archived March 28, 2004

Oil Shortage?

Stanley Reed, Business Week

Saudi officials like to fly visitors across the Empty Quarter, the forbidding desert that occupies the eastern portion of the kingdom, to visit the Shaybah oil field. Nestled amid stunning sand dunes like a ship in a vast ochre ocean, Shaybah is a source of national pride for the Saudis -- akin to the Hoover Dam or the Apollo space missions for Americans. To outsiders, the message is: When it comes to oil, you can count on us. "We are the most reliable producer and supplier of crude in the whole world," says Mahmoud M.

archived April 4, 2004

Safe to breath

Shane Perryman, Energy Bulletin

The Guardian recently ran an article titled: "The oxygen crisis: Could the decline of oxygen in the atmosphere undermine our health and threaten human survival?)

Not to worry. The O2 released from photosynthesis comes from H2O. Thus there will never be a shortage of material for the production of O2 so long as there is water on this planet. There is no "peak oxygen."

archived August 21, 2000